The Doreen Massey Reader

Edited by Brett Christophers, Rebecca Lave, Jamie Peck, Marion Werner

Hardback
£65.00  |  $95.00
ISBN 9781911116820
Paperback
£19.99  |  $30.00
ISBN 9781911116837
e-book
£19.99  |  $30.00
ISBN 9781911116844
368 pages   |  234 x 156mm   |  July 2018

Description

Doreen Massey (1944–2016) changed geography. Her ideas on space, region, labour, identity, ethics and capital transformed the field itself, while also attracting a wide audience in sociology, planning, political economy, cultural studies, gender studies and beyond. The significance of her contributions is difficult to overstate. Far from a dry defence of disciplinary turf, her claim that “geography matters” possessed both scholarly substance and political salience.

Through her most influential concepts – such as power-geometries and a “global sense of place” – she insisted on the active role of regions and places not simply in bearing the brunt of political-economic restructuring, but in reshaping the uneven geographies of global capitalism and the horizons of politics. In capturing how global forces articulated with the particularities of place, Massey’s work, right up until her death, was an inspiration for critical social sciences and political activists alike. It integrated theory and politics in the service of challenging and transforming both.

This collection of Massey’s writings brings together for the first time the full span of her formative contributions, showcasing the continuing relevance of her ideas to current debates on globalization, immigration, nationalism and neoliberalism, among other topics. With introductions from the editors, the collection represents an unrivalled distillation of the range and depth of Massey’s thinking. It is sure to remain an essential touchstone for social theory and critical geography for generations to come.


Contents

1. Out of place: Doreen Massey, radical geographer
Jamie Peck, Marion Werner, Rebecca Lave and Brett Christophers

Part 1 – Region
2. Towards a critique of industrial location theory (1973)
3. Labour must take over land (1973) (with Richard Barras and Andrew Broadbent)
4. The analysis of capitalist landownership: an investigation of the case of Great Britain (1977)
5. Regionalism: some current issues (1978)
6. A woman’s place? (1984) (with Linda McDowell)
7. The changing geography of trade unions (1989) (with Joe Painter)

Part 2 – Place
8. Beyond the coalfields: the work of the miners’ support groups (1985) (with Hilary Wainwright)
9. Power-geometry and a progressive sense of place (1993)
10. A place called home? (1992)
11. Masculinity, dualisms and high technology (1995)
12. The geography of power (2000)
13. Globalisation: what does it mean for geography? (2002)

Part 3 – Space
14. New directions in space (1985)
15. Flexible sexism (1991)
16. Reflections on gender and geography (1995)
17. Politics and space/time (1992)
18. Reflections on debates over a decade (1995)
19. Philosophy and politics of spatiality: some considerations (1999)
20. Concepts of space and power in theory and in political practice (2009)


Author Information

Brett Christophers is Professor of Human Geography at Uppsala University, Sweden. He is Editor of Environment and Planning A and the author of four books, most recently The Great Leveler: Capitalism and Competition in the Court of Law (Harvard, 2016) and Banking Across Boundaries: Placing Finance in Capitalism (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013). Email: brett.christophers@kultgeog.uu.se.


Rebecca Lave is an Associate Professor at Indiana University, Bloomington. She has published in journals ranging from Science to Social Studies of Science, and is the author of Fields and Streams: Stream Restoration, Neoliberalism, and the Future of Environmental Expertise (2012). She is also co-editor of the Handbook of Political Economy of Science (2017) and the Handbook of Critical Physical Geography (2017). Email: rlave@indiana.edu.


Jamie Peck is Canada Research Chair in Urban and Regional Political Economy and Professor of Geography at the University of British Columbia. He is Managing Editor of Environment and Planning A and the author or editor of more than a dozen books, including Fast Policy: Experimental Statecraft at the Thresholds of Neoliberalism (Minnesota, 2015) and Constructions of Neoliberal Reason (Oxford, 2010). Email: jamie.peck@ubc.ca.


Marion Werner is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography at the State University of New York, Buffalo. She is the author of Global Displacements: The Making of Uneven Development in the Caribbean (Wiley-Blackwell, 2016). Email: wernerm@buffalo.edu.


Purchase Options

Hardback
Paperback
e-book

Inspection Copy

Request an inspection copy.